Ethnic Federalism in Pakistan: Federal Design, Construction of Ethno-Linguistic Identity and Group Conflict

Published - Jun 6, 2014

Region-based political groups in Pakistan have historically mobilized for political power largely around ethnic and linguistic identities. Curiously, despite the fact that ethnic conflict over regional autonomy has centered on the design and structure of federal power-sharing arrangements, there is little acknowledgment in the larger discourse of the use of federal structures by the state to marginalize, or conversely amplify the dominance of, certain regional and sub-regional groups. In a law journal article published in the Harvard Journal on Racial and Ethnic Justice, Research Fellow Maryam S. Khan takes a distinct approach based on federal design to explain the phenomena of ethnicity-based politics and conflict in Pakistan through a case study of Sindhi-Muhajir relations and the rise of Muhajir nationalism in the 1970s.

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Khan, M. S. (2014). Ethnic Federalism in Pakistan: Federal Design, Construction of Ethno-Linguistic Identity and Group Conflict. Harvard Journal on Racial and Ethnic Justice, 30.

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